Return to Auxerre

Sunlight highlights Joigny

Sunlight highlights Joigny

The route between Melun and Auxerre has become a well-worn path for Wanderlust. At the end of 2015 she made her third trip on this segment of the Seine and the Yonne. Novelty of the new places has been replaced by the comfortable familiarity. In the towns we know where the restaurants, the markets, and all of the other important stuff for day-to-day living is located. We just settle in and take in what the town has to offer. There’s no longer any stress in finding things. Continue reading

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Melun: Vaux-de-Vicomte

Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte

Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte

A six-kilometer bike ride from Wanderlust’s mooring on the River Seine in Melun France is the Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte. Vaux-de-Vicomte is the creation of Nicolas Fouquet. Continue reading

Moret-sur-Loing

Wanderlust moored in Moret-sur-Loing.

Wanderlust moored in Moret-sur-Loing.

Leaving the River Yonne at Montereau-sur-Yonne we headed a short distance down the Seine until we reached the confluence with the Loing River in Saint-Mammès. As we turned up the Loing we formally started on the Bourbonnais Route. The Bourbonnais Route consists of four canals, the Canal du Loing, the Canal de Briare, the Canal lateral a la Loire, and the Canal du Centre. This route would ultimately take us to the Saône River. Continue reading

The Seine to the Yonne: Melun to Montereau-Fault-Yonne

Wanderlust moored in Saint-Mammès

Wanderlust moored in Saint-Mammès

By river it is 43 km and three locks from Melun to Montereau-Fault-Yonne. It is an easy one-day cruise that at our usual pace took two days to do. In between we had our final overnight stop on the Seine in Saint-Mammès, a popular stopover for the commercial barges. Continue reading

The Marne to the Seine: Meaux to Melun

Wanderlust moored at Lagny-sur-Marne

Wanderlust moored at Lagny-sur-Marne

Of all the waterways that we’ve experienced since Wanderlust arrived in France in September the Marne was our favorite. From the vineyards of Champagne to the historic towns on the approach to Paris, the river is lined with pleasures. Indeed, it has been so nice on the Marne that we found that we’d become sticky. Each departure from a mooring came with reluctance. But we had to move on. We needed to reach our winter mooring in Burgundy. So all good things must come to an end. And in the case of the River Marne, the end occurs at the confluence with the Seine on the edge of Paris. Continue reading