The Table of Issues

Wanderlust cruises the River Rhone.

For most readers this entry will certainly rank as one of the driest and least interesting posts on Barge Wanderlust. Indeed, for regular readers looking to get a glimpse of Wanderlust’s travels, I’d suggest you that you skip on to the next entry. Then again, if you suffer from insomnia, this might well be your cure. Continue reading

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The Winter of Our Discontent

Wanderlust on the Thames not long after launch

There was little certainty for Wanderlust’s future as we retreated to San Francisco for the 2016-2017 winter. On the repairs side, the legal dispute with the builder had frozen our ability to have the needed work done on our boat. There was no end to the dispute in sight. Indeed, if anything, the two parties had moved further apart. Continue reading

The 2016 Season

The 2016 season started with high water in Auxerre.

Towards the end of the 2015 cruising season we started to consider our 2016 route options. Though we had just cruised 2,295 km including 734 locks, there were still plenty of water in France and Europe left to explore. Indeed it seemed that 2016 was the right time to make a first foray into Belgium and Holland. We wanted to explore the north before we became too entrenched in the waterways of France. The boaters that we talked to say that it is lovely up north. We wanted to see for ourselves. Continue reading

Canal de Bourgogne: Dijon to Saint Jean de Losne

We met our friends Dave and Wendy from Barge Blue Belle on the way to Saint Jean de Losne.

It was difficult for us to get sufficiently motivated to leave Dijon. We like it there. And the longer we stayed the stronger our psychological dependence on Dijon’s covered market became. Dijon’s marché couvert is our happy place. Only with effort were we able to force ourselves to continue on our way to St. Jean de Losne. Continue reading

Canal de Bourgogne: Fleurey-sur-Ouche to Dijon

Place de la Libération, Dijon

Continuing on from Fleurey-sur-Ouche Wanderlust’s next stop was Dijon. Though we debated stopping in between it seemed that the pull of the biggest city on route was too much to ignore. Continue reading

Canal de Bourgogne: Ancy-le-Franc to Ravières

Calm waters in Ravières

Calm waters in Ravières

In Ancy-le-Franc, on the morning of the 28th of July, I turned the key on the dash to start Wanderlust’s main engine. The engine came to life with a rumble. After a week of struggles, we could finally continue on our way along the canal. Continue reading

Canal de Bourgogne: Troubles in Ancy-le-Franc

The courtyard of Château d'Ancy-le-Franc

The courtyard of Château d’Ancy-le-Franc

From Tanlay, Ancy-le-Franc, Wanderlust’s next stop, is a day’s cruise. In Ancy we planned to tour the Château d’Ancy-le-Franc. The chateau sits 500 meters of so from the port on the Canal de Bourgogne. Unless the chateau happened to be closed for one of the many French holidays that always seem to catch us by surprise or as a result of a force majeure, we would pay nine Euros each to see the inside. Continue reading

Wanderlust Wanders: Auxerre to Migennes

For Gigi delays mean more shore leave.

For Gigi delays mean more shore leave.

On June 29th 2016, after a series of delays, it was finally time for Wanderlust to leave her winter mooring. In April, two and a half months earlier, Becky, myself, and our dog Gigi returned from California to Auxerre France. Wanderlust spent its second winter in Auxerre’s attractive port de plaisance. Normally we’d return to the barge, spend a week or so getting things set, and then head off onto the inland waterways. But that would not be the case in 2016. Continue reading

Small Leaks, Big Problems

A hotel barge making maneuvers at the start of the season in Auxerre

A hotel barge making maneuvers at the start of the season in Auxerre

When we arrived back in France on April 13th of 2016 it was clear that the builder would not be fixing Wanderlust’s many build related faults anytime soon. Indeed, it seemed they might just try to pay us some small sum of money to go away. It was time for us to find a boatyard to do the repair work. In fact we might have to find a few yards; identifying a single yard with all of the capabilities needed to complete the full scope of the repair work would be a challenge. Continue reading