Canal de Bourgogne: Montbard to Venarey-les-Laumes

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Wanderlust on the Canal de Bourgogne

Soon after we tied Wanderlust up in Montbard we learned that an American couple, traveling in their Linssen cruiser, was moored nearby. When I say “we”, I really mean our dog Gigi made the discovery. As is often the case, Gigi made the first introduction. We just happened to be on the other end of the leash. Continue reading

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Canal de Bourgogne: Ancy-le-Franc to Ravières

Calm waters in Ravières

Calm waters in Ravières

In Ancy-le-Franc, on the morning of the 28th of July, I turned the key on the dash to start Wanderlust’s main engine. The engine came to life with a rumble. After a week of struggles, we could finally continue on our way along the canal. Continue reading

Lutzelbourg

Lutzelbourg viewed from the canal.

Lutzelbourg viewed from the canal.

Four locks from the bottom of the Arzviller Inclined Plane, at the base of the wooded valley floor, is the small town of Lutzelbourg. A bit French and a bit Germanic, Lutzelbourg is a romantic postcard of the Alsace. The scene along the canal near the town is straight out of a hire boat company brochure. Continue reading

Saint-Louis-Arzviller Inclined Plane

An audience watches as Wanderlust descends.

An audience watches as Wanderlust descends.

When Wanderlust reached the top of the Écluse de Réchicourt-le-Château she entered the 33 km-long summit pound of the canal de la Marne au Rhin (est). Heading west to Strasbourg and the Rhine River, she left the Sarre and Moselle drainages behind. After an overnight stop at PK 239, and a little more mopping up from the latest bilge flood, we were on our way. This day we’d pass through two more tunnels before descending on the infamous Saint-Louis-Arzviller inclined plane. Continue reading

Réchicourt Lock: Unexpected Waters

Wanderlust mooring above the Réchicourt Lock.

Wanderlust mooring above the Réchicourt Lock.

Just after passing through the Écluse de Réchicourt-le-Château we pulled to the bank to take some pictures and eat lunch. The layby quay was full so moved a short distance forward to a bank mooring with stout bollards set well back on the shore. It was a tricky place to tie up. We had to maneuver close to the bank, hover, and put the boarding plank out so we could get the ropes to shore and over the bollards. It all worked out well enough, or so we thought. Continue reading