Canal du Rhône au Rhin: Saint Jean de Losne to Ranchot and Back

The start of the 2017 cruising season had Wanderlust hanging near the river port town of Saint Jean de Losne France. Follow-up surveys, necessitated by the builder’s surveyor’s report, were needed unless the builder had a sudden change of heart, … Continue reading

The Saône: First Lock of the Season

Wanderlust enters the Auxonne lock, her first of the 2017 season

The first and last locks of the season are notable events. Wanderlust’s first lock passage in 2017 came on April 13th as she passed through the Auxonne lock on the River Saône. As locks go, this is an easy one, it’s much wider that normal for a Freycinet length lock. The tricky part is waiting for the lock to open. There’s an eddy on the lock approach. It makes things mildly interesting when you are breaking off the off seasoning helming rust. Continue reading

The Table of Issues

Wanderlust cruises the River Rhone.

For most readers this entry will certainly rank as one of the driest and least interesting posts on Barge Wanderlust. Indeed, for regular readers looking to get a glimpse of Wanderlust’s travels, I’d suggest you that you skip on to the next entry. Then again, if you suffer from insomnia, this might well be your cure. Continue reading

The Winter of Our Discontent

Wanderlust on the Thames not long after launch

There was little certainty for Wanderlust’s future as we retreated to San Francisco for the 2016-2017 winter. On the repairs side, the legal dispute with the builder had frozen our ability to have the needed work done on our boat. There was no end to the dispute in sight. Indeed, if anything, the two parties had moved further apart. Continue reading

Canal de Bourgogne: Dijon to Saint Jean de Losne

We met our friends Dave and Wendy from Barge Blue Belle on the way to Saint Jean de Losne.

It was difficult for us to get sufficiently motivated to leave Dijon. We like it there. And the longer we stayed the stronger our psychological dependence on Dijon’s covered market became. Dijon’s marché couvert is our happy place. Only with effort were we able to force ourselves to continue on our way to St. Jean de Losne. Continue reading

Canal de Bourgogne: Dijon, the Palais des Ducs and the Musée des Beaux-Arts

Portrait de Jeanne de Montaigu (Maître de Saint-Jean-de-Luze)

The longer we stayed in Dijon the more it appealed to us. With a little over 150,000 residents, the commune is more happening than the mostly rural villages that we had passed as we traveled along the Canal de Bourgogne. Between the restaurants, the wine, and the tourist attractions, there was motivation to linger past our penciled in departure day.

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Canal de Bourgogne: Entering Dijon

Wanderlust pauses for lunch inside a lock on the way to Dijon.

As we neared the port in Dijon we moved Wanderlust into one of the last locks of the day. Looking up we noticed a “slight” problem just ahead: There was no water in the pound below the lock. Without water, Wanderlust was not going to continue wandering. Continue reading

Canal de Bourgogne: Fleurey-sur-Ouche to Dijon

Place de la Libération, Dijon

Continuing on from Fleurey-sur-Ouche Wanderlust’s next stop was Dijon. Though we debated stopping in between it seemed that the pull of the biggest city on route was too much to ignore. Continue reading

Canal de Bourgogne: La Brussiere-sur-Ouche to Fleurey-sur-Ouche

The Burgundy Canal

Leaving the port de plaisance in Pont d’Ouche, Wanderlust continued on her way towards the River Saone. Our guides and the lockkeepers suggested a stop in Fleurey-sur-Ouche. When we arrived, we could see that Fleurey was indeed popular. In fact it was so popular we had trouble finding a workable spot for the night at the bank. In the end, as it usually happens, we worked out something.

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Canal de Bourgogne: Pont d’Ouche to la Brussiere-sur-Ouche

Wanderlust in la Bussière

In our opinion the most attractive segments of the Canal de Bourgogne bracket the waterway’s summit pond. It is not unusual for canals to wind and climb as they work their way to the highest point. Though the climbing or descending usually comes with numerous locks, the appeal of the hilly terrain rewards the work. And so it is on the Bourgogne. Continue reading